Where SaaS meets mHealth

those larger customers “are waiting for companies like Epic to install the software over a period of many months,” Lake said.

[Infographic: What mHealth will look like in 2024.]

That's not to say the big guns like Epic and Cerner aren’t investing in cloud-based data warehouses that will allow real-time updating, predicting and alerting in order to underpin enterprise-level EHRs, Lake noted. 

Obviously SaaS, like all disruptive technologies, is causing a rethink in the healthcare community.

Part of the allure is that prospective customers, be those small physician practices or large health networks, can put a toe in the water. They can look at an SaaS app more closely, where mobility is a critical component and the old-fashioned client-server solution where customization, reliability and a long-term relationship with a vendor is more important now competes with the instant gratification of deploying an application that took only five minutes to install.

Ephraim Schwartz is a freelance writer based in Burlington, Vt. Schwartz is a recognized mobile expert and columnist, having spent 15 years as Editor-at-Large for InfoWorld, half of them covering the mobile space. Prior to that he was Editor-in-Chief of Laptop Magazine.

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